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SORRY CHARLIE: Charlie Rose Accused of Lewd Calls, Nudity, Groping by Former Employees

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Charlie Rose, PBS interviewer and co-anchor of CBS This Morning, stands accused of sexual harassment by eight women.

The Washington Post reports that the allegations include “lewd phone calls, walking around naked in their presence, or groping their breasts, buttocks, and genital areas.”

The accusers include employees and aspiring employees of Charlie Rose, the bare-bones, black-backgrounded, hour-long PBS interview program hearkening back to James Day’s Conversations from public television’s early years.

Of the two dozen or so Rose employees interviewed for the story, the Post says more than half either witnessed outright harassment or behavior that made them uncomfortable. A common interaction saw Rose giving shoulder rubs to the young women dubbed “Charlie’s Angels,” the story alleges. Rose’s bathroom behavior, which allegedly involved summoning underlings to him as he bathed, became so well-known by the women that they gave it a nickname: “the shower trick.”

Another anonymous woman describes Rose as repeatedly putting his hands down her pants.

Shortly after the release of the explosive Post report on Monday afternoon, CBS suspended Rose, who contributes to 60 Minutes and has occasionally anchored the evening news in addition to his other duties, and PBS announced an immediate halt to the distribution of Rose’s interview program.

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Lunatic Legislators Know No Bounds in California, Brown Signs Bill Eliminating Monetary Bail

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Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed sweeping legislation to eliminate cash bail in California. The change, which will take effect in October 2019, goes further than any other state in the country to remove money from pretrial detention.

“Today, California reforms its bail system so that rich and poor alike are treated fairly,” Brown said in a statement.

Under Senate Bill 10, California will replace bail with “risk assessments” of individuals and nonmonetary conditions of release. Counties will establish local agencies to evaluate any individual arrested on felony charges for their likelihood of returning for court hearings and their chances of re-arrest.

A person whose risk to public safety and risk of failure to appear is determined to be “low” would be released with the least restrictive nonmonetary conditions possible. “Medium-risk” individuals could be released or held depending on local standards. “High-risk” individuals would remain in custody until their arraignment, as would anyone who has committed certain sex crimes or violent felonies, is arrested for driving under the influence for the third time in less than 10 years, is already under supervision by the courts or has violated any conditions of pretrial release in the previous five years.

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