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Kevin Janson Neal named as suspect in Rancho Tehama School shooting

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"I'm on a cliff and there's nowhere to go."

 

It is being reported that Kevin Janson Neal, the suspect in the case of the horrific Rancho Tehama School shooting is the same man who was arrested earlier this year for an assault against an elderly person that resulted in likely “great bodily injury.”

The mother of the gunman who killed four people during a shooting rampage in Northern California said he called her a day earlier and told her “it’s all over now.”

Kevin Neal’s mother told The Associated Press in a phone interview Tuesday from her home in Raleigh, North Carolina, that her son was frustrated by constant feuding with his neighbors and told her “I’m on a cliff and there’s nowhere to go.”

“I’m on a cliff and there’s nowhere to go.”

Neal’s mother, who would only use her first name Anne, said she posted bail in January after her son was charged with stabbing one of the neighbors.

She was unaware of his connection to Tuesday’s rampage in the rural community of Rancho Tehama Reserve until contacted by AP.

Police have declined to identify the shooter until his relatives are notified but confirmed the same man was charged with the January assault. The district attorney, Gregg Cohen, told the Sacramento Bee the man in that case is Kevin Neal.

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Lunatic Legislators Know No Bounds in California, Brown Signs Bill Eliminating Monetary Bail

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Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed sweeping legislation to eliminate cash bail in California. The change, which will take effect in October 2019, goes further than any other state in the country to remove money from pretrial detention.

“Today, California reforms its bail system so that rich and poor alike are treated fairly,” Brown said in a statement.

Under Senate Bill 10, California will replace bail with “risk assessments” of individuals and nonmonetary conditions of release. Counties will establish local agencies to evaluate any individual arrested on felony charges for their likelihood of returning for court hearings and their chances of re-arrest.

A person whose risk to public safety and risk of failure to appear is determined to be “low” would be released with the least restrictive nonmonetary conditions possible. “Medium-risk” individuals could be released or held depending on local standards. “High-risk” individuals would remain in custody until their arraignment, as would anyone who has committed certain sex crimes or violent felonies, is arrested for driving under the influence for the third time in less than 10 years, is already under supervision by the courts or has violated any conditions of pretrial release in the previous five years.

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